We all know how challenging it can be to find good quality hard evidence that training teams and leaders in Human Factors awareness and skills enhances Patient Safety. Health Education England are seeking such evidence now for all forms of training. Quite right too. We have worked with various teams over the years notably at the University of Oxford with varying degrees of success. There are a plethora of published papers out there with our names on them. One of the arguments has been what to measure and I believe firmly that the only real measure is patient outcome. We have taken part in other recent research and I am led to believe that some further positive results will shortly be published. 

Some of you who have been with us a while will know that we were invited in to Newcastle Neurosurgery unit by Patrick Mitchell, the clinical lead, in 2006 where after some in-house training they had reduced the wrong-side error rate for cranial and spinal procedures dramatically (from 1 in 300) but then had a recurrence. 
The training consisted of putting all the direct theatre team and their immediate leaders through a one day interactive training course in understanding the problems around human behaviour and fallibility and practical solutions. This was supported by coaching to help embed the skills in practice. I think it is fair to add that two senior team members found it difficult to attend.
The result is now over 5 ½ years without a side error from a pre-intervention rate of 1 in 300! That is over 21,500 sided procedures in the unit with essentially the same entire team, although one of the senior clinicians did leave a couple of years ago – to concentrate on private practice.
 
The results have been published and is available to download freely - Click here to view full report in PDF format
 
I don’t believe it is unfair to say that the fundamental issues were around behaviour, especially team briefings and checklist discipline. Incidentally this was before the WHO checklist was published. Patrick Mitchell is a private pilot himself and has a clear understanding of the importance of checklists in safe performance. 
I would like to emphasise that the Atrainability team didn't achieve this –we simply helped the front-line team to build and maintain the confidence and skills to deal with the problems successfully. 
We encourage all our clients, colleagues and prospective clients to continue to seek and share evidence and best practice to improve Patient Safety for everyone. 
The Atrainability team are of course, very happy to explore further opportunities to develop solutions to human error, poor behaviour and help teams avoid avoidable harm.