Atrainability Blog

Here we share some thoughts, insights and ideas related to Human Factors Training

I could have told you that

Many high-performing professionals make their job look easy. Well maybe not micro-surgery but aviation is a good example that it seems is widely misunderstood. I hear many people say "you pilots don't understand – we deal with sick people who aren't OK when we start treating them. You wouldn't get airborne in a plane that wasn't OK" 

Well pretty much of course not. But if only life were that simple! Pilots and for that matter cabin crew, are there for emergencies, generally unanticipated, often at periods of low arousal. Look at Kegworth – 1989 - routine flight Heathrow- Belfast - relaxed take-off and climb and suddenly an engine breaks apart. The crew, who must have been terrified, misidentify the problem and shut down the wrong engine. 47 people die.

Lessons learned? Well it is an imperfect World and the same essential error happened in Taiwan in January 2015. You will probably remember the horrific images of the plane with wings vertical crossing a bridge before plunging into the river killing 43. The error was the wrong engine shut down again.

However we all now accept that flying is significantly safer than any other form of transport taking into account the number of flights per annum. Things do go wrong but what helps prevent tragic potentially fatal accidents is training and preparation. Especially thinking ahead and discussing what could go wrong and having a plan in place for how it would be handled if it did. Think Captain Sullenberger and crew and the Hudson River successful outcome.

How often have you said with hindsight "I could have seen that coming" or "I could have told you that would happen"? Experience is a great learning tool but trial and error is simply not acceptable.

That seems to be what healthcare is doing though. There is still a general reluctance to learn day to day success, failure and near-misses.

This is what Human Factors training can aid such as how to share plans across the team and encourage input from everyone who might spot the impending threat and intervene for safety. Even more so when it comes to post-hoc debriefing discussions about what worked well and what could be improved.

When you get down to it aviation and health and social care is about risk management. Risk management is about Human Factors. Mental preparedness and appropriate hierarchy and open communication.

Inappropriate hierarchy and what to do about it
Human Factors – no longer an option

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Friday, 28 July 2017