Atrainability Blog

Here we share some thoughts, insights and ideas related to Human Factors Training

Sharing the Learning

I had never really thought about situational awareness in the past. I'm a pharmacist myself. I know that I've made mistakes. None of my mistakes have been life threatening; in fact, they've probably been near-misses, but this (course) made me think about how situational awareness affects the way we do things- Julie Jones, Birmingham Healthcare NHS Trust

Atrainability has provided Human Factors training for over 14 years and during that time our team has spoken to lots of people at various stages in their career, and across a range of different disciplines.

We've always been grateful when participants are open about sharing their learning experiences with us. One thing that seems to occur often is that during or shortly after the training sessions there is a moment of clarity when dots are joined and suddenly that person understands how and why those near-misses happened and more importantly what they can do to avoid future errors. There are many stories we could share, but here are a couple :

I was talking about having compassion for patients as well as colleagues on a course recently, and a Dental Surgeon who was attending said: "Quite a lot of patients are just awkward with unrealistic expectations" he went on to say that he'd received a significant number of complaints and some claims. I asked him if this was just something which he encountered or did his colleagues also find the same? After the course, he thanked me and said that moment had made him realise he was perhaps playing a part in the problems he was experiencing, and he would be more aware of his communications with both patients and colleagues when he returned to work. – Trevor Dale

During the coffee break of a course I was running an F2 Doctor approached to thank me, and explained the Situational Awareness module was a light bulb moment for her. During a night shift, she had a difficult hand-over at a time of high workload. The nurse had handed over a patient with a verbal description of a dosage of a respiratory drug, there was a mistake made but the Doctor was clear of the dosage in her mind. The Doctor was working very hard and so did not acknowledge the dosage handover to the nurse. She told me she now understands why she did not read back the instruction. She was stressed and her speech had been degraded due to an overload of information. Although she was cleared of any wrongdoing, she was troubled why she made the mistake. The Doctor was delighted to understand that her mistake was just an indication of her human fallibility; not incompetence, and that now she felt she had the tools to help her avoid repeating that error. – Matt Lindley


As you may be aware, Atrainability has been running Human Factors Open Courses this year at key locations in England. We can't promise Light bulb moments for all, but we can promise a course which will help you find solutions and gain a greater awareness of how you and your teams' behaviour, communication, leadership and briefing and debriefing skills can improve outcomes for everyone. 

If you can't make the dates listed on our Open Course page, or if we haven't announced new dates yet, do get in touch to discuss how our bespoke in-house courses can help your team. 


Trevor

The Remarkable Truth about 'People Stuff'
How compassionate care can reduce mistakes.

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Tuesday, 17 October 2017