Atrainability Blog

Here we share some thoughts, insights and ideas related to Human Factors Training

Walking the Tightrope...

Self-Confidence is vital but Self-Awareness is Key to Learning Success.

Confidence is a vital commodity when it comes to delivering safe, effective performance in any job, sport or profession. One must have a degree of self-belief in order to fly a plane full of people, compete in sports or indeed perform medical treatment. However, a simple, basic facet of being human is that we are all fallible.


Are we aware of our response to our own errors?

Firstly, we have to realise that we have indeed made an error, because initially whatever action was taken was likely done with the expectation that it was correct. The dawning realisation that we have indeed committed an erroneous act can trigger a response, which could be fight, flight or freeze. Once confidence is damaged, it can manifest in a variety of ways. If we have a critical voice in our head, telling ourselves off; compounded by friends, family or colleagues also berating us, we can spiral downwards into depression. Often if we are unable to accept that we're responsible for a mistake we can respond defensively by directing our responses outwards;


                                                          "Why didn't YOU tell me!"

                                                         "Why didn't YOU stop me?"

                                                         "YOU didn't tell me…"


…in other words, if I can't accept my own fallibility it must be yours. This in some cases leads to arrogant behaviour, and does not make for safe, effective teams.

We as individuals need to work on our self-awareness, take responsibility and manage our responses, but we also need a team around us who don't continue the cycle of berating and instead supports and learns when mistakes are made.

How has aviation dealt with this? By embedding Human Factors principles at all levels from Board to the frontline.

The Board must walk the talk or any transformation program will fail, because it is perception at the individual level of the safety culture that is crucial to success.

Pre-1980's aviation training focussed purely on the technical skills of flying a plane. Effective communication, team-work, situation awareness – these were not considered important. However, with the improved use of black box recordings and analysis of significant aircraft accidents it became apparent that it was the human element that was mostly at fault. What is now known as – Human Factors.

How was it dealt with? By educating flight crew and then embedding effective human factors practice in ALL technical training. Although it took time, it is now completely accepted as part of the culture. Furthermore regular refresher training, feedback and assessment is given to flight crew on their flying skills and their interpersonal and cognitive skills to keep best practice at the forefront of their daily practice. In terms of appraisals these are taken very seriously.

If a pilot fails to meet the standards in either category of technical or non-technical skills he/she will be given further training and ultimately he/she can be removed from service. Just imagine if this took place to the same extent in healthcare and some other professions.

The fundamental point though is to understand error and the causes of error, and to accept them and to work with them. Humility is an essential part of professionalism. One of our clients (a large critical care unit in a major trauma centre) has recently contacted us to say how our training has had an impact on their team.

Furthermore we've been told that staff turnover has been reduced to a very low level indeed. These changes have been visible after in-depth Human Factors training and coaching, although they cannot be directly attributed of course.

Atrainability would be delighted to help any team or organisation delve further into their own short-comings and help to highlight their areas of success. Contact us for an informal, confidential discussion or alternatively enrol for our upcoming Open Courses listed here.
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Friday, 15 December 2017