Blog

Search our Site

Atrainability Blog

Here we share some thoughts, insights and ideas related to Human Factors Training

Walking the Tightrope...

Self-Confidence is vital but Self-Awareness is Key to Learning Success.

Confidence is a vital commodity when it comes to delivering safe, effective performance in any job, sport or profession. One must have a degree of self-belief in order to fly a plane full of people, compete in sports or indeed perform medical treatment. However, a simple, basic facet of being human is that we are all fallible.


Are we aware of our response to our own errors?

Firstly, we have to realise that we have indeed made an error, because initially whatever action was taken was likely done with the expectation that it was correct. The dawning realisation that we have indeed committed an erroneous act can trigger a response, which could be fight, flight or freeze. Once confidence is damaged, it can manifest in a variety of ways. If we have a critical voice in our head, telling ourselves off; compounded by friends, family or colleagues also berating us, we can spiral downwards into depression. Often if we are unable to accept that we're responsible for a mistake we can respond defensively by directing our responses outwards;


                                                          "Why didn't YOU tell me!"

                                                         "Why didn't YOU stop me?"

                                                         "YOU didn't tell me…"


…in other words, if I can't accept my own fallibility it must be yours. This in some cases leads to arrogant behaviour, and does not make for safe, effective teams.

We as individuals need to work on our self-awareness, take responsibility and manage our responses, but we also need a team around us who don't continue the cycle of berating and instead supports and learns when mistakes are made.

How has aviation dealt with this? By embedding Human Factors principles at all levels from Board to the frontline.

The Board must walk the talk or any transformation program will fail, because it is perception at the individual level of the safety culture that is crucial to success.

Pre-1980's aviation training focussed purely on the technical skills of flying a plane. Effective communication, team-work, situation awareness – these were not considered important. However, with the improved use of black box recordings and analysis of significant aircraft accidents it became apparent that it was the human element that was mostly at fault. What is now known as – Human Factors.

How was it dealt with? By educating flight crew and then embedding effective human factors practice in ALL technical training. Although it took time, it is now completely accepted as part of the culture. Furthermore regular refresher training, feedback and assessment is given to flight crew on their flying skills and their interpersonal and cognitive skills to keep best practice at the forefront of their daily practice. In terms of appraisals these are taken very seriously.

If a pilot fails to meet the standards in either category of technical or non-technical skills he/she will be given further training and ultimately he/she can be removed from service. Just imagine if this took place to the same extent in healthcare and some other professions.

The fundamental point though is to understand error and the causes of error, and to accept them and to work with them. Humility is an essential part of professionalism. One of our clients (a large critical care unit in a major trauma centre) has recently contacted us to say how our training has had an impact on their team.

Furthermore we've been told that staff turnover has been reduced to a very low level indeed. These changes have been visible after in-depth Human Factors training and coaching, although they cannot be directly attributed of course.

Atrainability would be delighted to help any team or organisation delve further into their own short-comings and help to highlight their areas of success. Contact us for an informal, confidential discussion or alternatively enrol for our upcoming Open Courses listed here.
  4907 Hits
  0 Comments
4907 Hits
0 Comments

Compassion Costs Nothing?

Compassion Costs Nothing?

Compassion; to empathise for others, to show you care; what does this cost in psychological and emotional terms? 

At my great age I just fell into a trap at a conference of agreeing that compassion costs nothing. How could I do that? The emotional cost of true empathy (as opposed to simple 'passive' listening) can be huge. It can be draining for those in caring professions - constantly feeling compassion and empathy for service users, patients and relatives - it takes its toll. This may explain why front line teams sometimes seem so dispassionate. Would they really have entered into such professions if that was what they truly felt?

What could have happened?

Well when we say "physician heal thyself" we tend to think of the physiological; food, water, putting ones feet up – if you like, the most obvious, visible signs of wellness. But when we consider the emotional and psychological toll that caring for others exerts it is in fact, blindingly obvious. What are we doing to provide our front line workers with the awareness and tools to handle the inevitable stress that comes with caring for unwell people? Do we even encourage ourselves or others to 'tune in' to our own emotional state, let alone put strategies in place for our own well-being?

We neglect our psychological and emotional wellness at our peril.

Atrainability have developed training to help deal with all aspects of wellness and stress. We're always available for an informal, empathetic chat to discuss your specific needs. Click here to contact us today.


  4317 Hits
  0 Comments
4317 Hits
0 Comments

How can we help minimise errors in Child Protection?

​What does safeguarding have in common with flying Boeing 747s? Well in terms of why things go wrong, perhaps more than most people realise.

No matter what walk of life you work within, human fallibility interferes. A brief examination of many serious case reviews shows comments about missed signs of abuse, missed opportunities to intervene. The recent SCR into Levi-Blu Cassin refers to serious failings and 'professional optimism' http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-34416644 . Professor Eileen Munro in her report subtitled 'A child-centred system' published in May 2011 wrote "errors and mistakes should be accepted as to some degree inevitable and to be expected, given the complexity of the task and work environment."

Of course it is never quite so easy to spot things when perpetrators are concealing the harm. Consider Baby P where his Mother concealed his facial bruising under chocolate. Furthermore the paediatrician who examined him before his death had not been told he was on a child protection plan. This was an apparently simple communication error that had immense consequences because she was not aware of the background.

Very few of us work with colleagues who intend harm, but error is rife. Much of it is due to our being asked to work in ways which we are simply not designed for, such as extreme workload, interruptions and distractions. Also this case as I write http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-34547660 demonstrates the importance of shared information to build Situation Awareness. The police failed to pass on vital information that the father had a relevant record of domestic abuse. Situation Awareness is a crucial concept referring to the 'mental model' we all have of what we are expecting now and what happens next. When this conflicts with what we see and experience there is clearly a problem.

There is a potential danger sign anytime you hear yourself or others say "Oh, I thought this or that was what we are doing" or perhaps "I am seeing this and you are not". There are classic signs that Situation Awareness is being lost, such as conflict between 2 sources of information. However to simply blame 'being human' is not good enough for the professional. To us it is incumbent to recognise how and why we all make mistakes and adopt methods that help keep us, our colleagues and our clients safe.

These non-technical skills are well understood and can be trained and coached. They encompass social skills such as Leadership, Followership, Cooperation and Management of others and cognitive skills of Situation Awareness and Decision making.

The culture is also riddled with blame, but what does it achieve? High reliability organisations recognize blame is mostly inappropriate and counter-productive. If it drives near-miss and error reporting underground it is useless.

The frontline teams know where the barriers to safety are, which procedures are not fit for purpose and where communication blocks occur. Their reports should be welcomed, responded to and acted upon. This is how commercial aviation has become safer and it can be adapted to safeguarding. Atrainability offers training solutions to address these issues.

Trevor Dale, Atrainability


  4132 Hits
  1 Comment
4132 Hits
1 Comment

SafeGuarding

Teams involved with safeguarding children and vulnerable adults suffer from the identical human fallibilities such as are prevalent throughout healthcare.

Typical failings are:

  • Cognition errors leading to erroneous situation awareness – failing to recognise symptoms of abuse
  • Intuitive decisions which would benefit from analytic review
  • Hierarchy challenge issues
  • Interagency communication problems
These same issues are present in other high reliability professions and are most highly developed in aviation.
Atrainability have structured training programmes for:

These same issues are present in other high reliability professions and are most highly developed in aviation.

Atrainability have structured training programmes for:

  • Training Safeguarding practitioners
  • Training Safeguarding ‘Champions’
  • Training Safeguarding Trainers
  5355 Hits
  0 Comments
5355 Hits
0 Comments